Northern Exposure Pewter Ornament (Made in Canada) Louis Roy Press

Mint Condition (storage case is cracked as pictured).

Locator #968WI

Northern Exposure Pewter Ornament Louis Roy Press

$39.95Price
  • Northern Exposure Pewter Ornament (Made in Canada) Louis Roy Press

    Mint Condition (storage case is cracked as pictured).

    The Roy Press is currently owned by The Niagara Parks Commission and has been displayed at several prominent locations, among them, the Provincial Legislature, the Royal Ontario Museum, Upper Canada Village and the Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa.

    This press is historically significant by its connection to John Graves Simcoe and his administration in Upper Canada. Before leaving England in 1791, Simcoe recognized the essential need for a printer. To organize a society in the wilderness, to promote settlement, communications and trade in the interests of the King, Simcoe engaged the services of one Louis Roy of Quebec to be the first King's printer for the new province. Roy brought his type and press with him, and on April 18, 1793, Roy issued the first number of the Upper Canada Gazette, at Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake), the provincial capital.

    As the settlement grew, the new province had to make its own "rules of the game" for pioneer life, and the government had to send out copies of these rules for all the players to see. Being the King's printer, Roy published pamphlets, usually laws or Simcoe's speeches, broadsides (posters), regulations and legal notices, along with whatever local and international news that could be gleaned from his sources.

    In October 1798, the capital moved from Newark to York (Toronto) and the press and government printing office was relocated there as well. The early printers changed frequently - Roy himself had returned to Quebec in the late summer of 1794. The government was an exacting task-master and paid poorly, and the drudgery and isolation of pioneer life was not attractive to everyone.

    The Roy Press, as it has come to be known, survived the sack of York in 1813 and continued to be used by the King's printers until it was superseded by faster, neater iron model presses.
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